How To Use Good Singing Techniques To Sing
At Your Best In The Studio Or On Stage

If you can master good singing techniques, you will dominate in the recording studio and on stage in front of thousands...

It happens all the time.

When singers come to record their voice, they back off, become hesitant, their voice shakes. They lose confidence in themselves and it shows up in their performance.

I see this all the time because I do a lot of audio engineering for various artists. After dealing with this situation a lot, I have developed techniques to get these singers back to where their voice needs to be…

… in awesome condition so they can nail every performance!

Have you ever wondered how you can get your voice into optimal shape?

Have you ever wondered how you can stay in tune perfectly, get your richest tone, and do it all so easily?

In the end it comes down to having good singing technique.

… Now I know it sounds boring to say that!

But when you are setting the studio or audience on fire with your amazing voice (because of your good singing technique), you may think it’s a little more interesting!

There are a few exercises in particular that really balance the voice out nicely, so you can sing at your best. All these exercises can be found in the Singing Made Simple audio program.

Usually if a singer is off the mark in their performance, I get them to practice a few of these exercises for fifteen minutes or so. The difference can be astounding. I’ve heard singers go from very average to delivering stunning performances, after fifteen minutes with these exercises.

Another little trick I like to play, is doing something unexpected to them as they sing.

Like for instance, flashing a torch in their face. Or swinging some random object over their head.

What?! Am I crazy?!

You may be thinking that’s one of the most bizarre things you’ve ever heard!

But let me tell you. Doing something like this can work like magic, and here’s why.

If the singer has something unexpected happen to them, all of a sudden their mind is not on their poor performance. This is good. Because usually it’s their thought processes that are getting in the way of a good performance.

They are likely thinking, “I’m not nailing this”, or “I’m sounding bad”, or “oh no, it’s recording”!

These thoughts are very off putting and will prevent a good performance. But if you throw something completely random and unexpected into the situation, they take their attention off the pressure they are under.

And most of the time, their voice magically “locks” into place. And they begin to sing to their full capabilities.

How can this help your singing?

Well, two things.

If your singing technique isn’t as good as it can be, practice exercises that will install good singing technique into your voice. The most effective way that I’ve found to do this is by using the Singing Made Simple audio program . The results I’ve heard these exercises get (in my voice and many others) are nothing short of outstanding.

A mix of these exercises and the occasional review with a good singing teacher seems to be a very effective method of learning to sing.

And the second thing?

Pay attention to what you’re thinking and feeling when you sing. If you notice you are singing really well, pay attention to how it’s feeling. And notice what you are thinking as well.

That’s what makes a great singer. They understand how it feels to sing well. A great singer has memorized the sensations of good singing technique. Now all he/she needs to do to sing at his best, is revisit these sensations.

Once again you can discover the sensation of singing with good singing techniques by practicing the exercises in the Singing Made Simple audio program.

And if you are an audio engineer or producer, try flashing a torch at your musicians once in a while. I’m sure you will be pleasantly surprised!

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